Tag Archives: organic mentoring

What’s your story?

Don’t we all love a good story?

It is my desire that this blog include disciple maker and discipleship training stories for the benefit of the readers.

I have been a disciple maker for more than 20 years and I will confess that few of those disciples went on to make disciples.  I have met even fewer Christians who have been discipled.  From my perspective, there is a big black hole in today’s church when it comes to disciple making.

Due to the lack of disciple making in today’s church, your stories can add immense value to other’s lives by telling them how you were discipled and how you make disciples.

You can submit your disciple maker or discipleship training story by emailing it to us at stories@disciplemakers.community.

Guidelines for Stories:

  • No more than 1,500 words
  • Your story will be edited, if needed, at the discretion of disciplemaker.community
  • Keep your story to the subject of discipleship or disciple making

Here are some questions to prompt your writing process:

  1. If you were discipled, how long ago, by whom (no names necessary), how long were you in discipleship training?
  2. What material was used to disciple you?
  3. What was the setting of your discipleship training?  (restaurant, home, church, etc.)
  4. Did your disciple maker take you out to do street ministry, dormitory ministry, evangelism?
    1. In other words, was there a practical aspect to your discipleship training?
  5. What impact did discipleship training have on your life?
  6. Would you recommend discipleship training for others?
  7. Did you become a disciple maker?
  8. If yes, what are your methods of disciple making?
  9. If you are a disciple maker, what materials and methods do you employ?
  10. What is the duration of your discipleship training?

Organic Mentoring

A book resource for disciple makers

Today, I listened to Family Life Today and found a resource that might be helpful to those of you who disciple younger women.
The radio broadcast features Barbara Neuman and Dr. Sue Edwards from Dallas Theological Seminary talking about a book they have written titled, Organic Mentoring.

Barbara Neumann and Dr. Sue Edwards write from their experiences of discipling younger women. They come alongside young women and build them up in the faith. In the context of Dallas Theological Seminary, Dr. Edwards and Barbara Neumann are in a setting where young women are in abundance and seeking guidance.

The points shared by Barbara Neumann and Dr. Sue Edwards are far less disciplined and structured than the disciple making I have been accustomed to in the past. Proving there are infinite processes that are effective. The points made in this broadcast are designed to meet the needs of the 20-something generation who are somewhat averse to having specific times, dates and processes in their lives.

Personally, I believe discipline is integral to disciple making. How does one become a disciple of Christ without the disciplines of the faith taught in the Bible? Timothy was a disciple of the apostle Paul. Paul spoke and wrote to Timothy on many occasions about discipline.

1 Timothy 4:7-8 Have nothing to do with godless myths and old wives’ tales; rather, train yourself to be godly. For physical training is of some value, but godliness has value for all things, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come.

2 Timothy 1:7 For God did not give us a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline.
What sort of disciples are you creating if there is no discipline involved in the process? I know this makes me sound very old school, but isn’t this a valid question to be asked?

Fellow PatientI adore the C.S. Lewis quote to the right. If a disciple maker has one most important thing to know, this quote says it all. We are all patients in the hands of God. Those who have been walking with Him longer possess the keys that will unlock the mysteries of the faith to new arrivals.

A few great points from this broadcast are:
• 80% of younger women drop out of mentoring programs within three months. They say, “This isn’t working for me.” Due to the structure of a program, it is awkward. The relationship feels forced.
• What needs to change in order to have real influence and impact?
• Teach the younger generation to make godly decisions.

 

I don’t know how long this radio broadcast will remain on the archive pages of Family Life today so please let me know when this link to the broadcast no longer works: “Organic Mentoring

Here is a PDF file of the program transcript as well. Organic Mentoring